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Looking Back

February 1958

Step back in time to see what area movie theaters were presenting in February 1958. Film titles are linked to the Internet Movie Database.

For more information about these theaters, see Cinema Treasures or Water Winter Wonderland.


Paths of Glory, which starred Kirk Douglas and was directed by Stanley Kubrick, opened in Detroit at the Palms on February 27, 1958. It had earlier opened in New York City on December 25, 1957 and in Los Angeles on December 20, 1957.

Also on the bill with Paths of Glory at the Palms was Man from God's Country (George Montgomery, Randy Stuart). These movies succeeded a twin bill of Fort Dobbs (Clint Walker, Virginia Mayo) and Across the Bridge (Rod Steiger, Maria Landi).

"Nothing better illustrates the speed with which our century has hastened from ghastly war to ghastlier war than the outmoded trench warfare of "Paths of Glory," wrote Detroit Free Press Movie Critic Helen Bower on February 27, 1958.

Other downtown Detroit movies when Paths of Glory opened were Raintree County (Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor, Eva Marie Saint) at the Adams; Jet Attack (John Agar, Audrey Totter) and Suicide Battalion (Michael Connors, John Ashley) at the Broadway Capitol; Sing Boy Sing (Tommy Sands, Lili Gentle, Edmond O'Brien) and Satchmo the Great (Louis Armstrong, Edward R. Murrow) at the Fox; and Bonjour Tristesse (Deborah Kerr, David Niven) at the Madison.

Also downtown were The Quiet American (Audie Murphy, Claude Dauphin, Michael Redgrave) and Gun Fever (Mark Stevens, John Lupton) at the Michigan; the Cinerama Search for Paradise at the Music Hall; A Farewell to Arms (Rock Hudson, Jennifer Jones, Vittorio De Sica) at the United Artists; and Tension at Table Rock (Richard Egan, Dorothy Malone) and Zero Hour! (Dana Andrews, Linda Darnell) at the 24-hour National.

The Redford and the Fisher were screening Walt Disney's live action Perri and Pursuit of the Graf Spree (John Gregson, Anthony Quayle). The Senate was showing Bombers B-52 (Karl Malden, Natalie Wood) and Kiss Them for Me (Cary Grant, Jayne Mansfield).

Brigitte Bardot was a big attraction in art houses, starring in ...And God Created Women at the Tranx Lux Krim and in The Bride is Much Too Beautiful at the Surf and Coronet (along with Tonight's the Night, starring David Niven, Yvonne De Carlo, and Barry Fitzgerald). Other art films were Ingmar Bergman's The Naked Night (Harriet Anderson) at the Temple Art Cinema, Mr. Hulot's Holiday (Jacques Tati) and The Sheep has Five Legs (Fernandel) at the Clawson-Playhouse; Silvana Mangano in Bitter Rice and Anna at the World; and Sins of Casanova at the Studio.

Paths of Glory played at the Palms until March 13, 1958 before being replaced with Lafayette Escadrille (Tab Hunter, Etchika Choureau) and The World was His Jury (Edmond O'Brien, Mona Freeman).

Paths of Glory screened at the Redford from May 14 to May 20, 1958, on double bills with Fort Dobbs (Clint Walker, Virginia Mayo) and Bonjour Tristesse (Deborah Kerr, David Niven).

Ann Arbor audiences were treated to the opening of Paths of Glory at the State on March 9, 1958, after a run of A Farewell to Arms (Rock Hudson, Jennifer Jones, Vittorio De Sica). Also playing in Ann Arbor that day were Sing Boy Sing (Tommy Sands, Lili Gentle, Edmond O'Brien) at the Michigan and The Dressmaker (Fernandel, Suzy Delair) at the Campus.

Paths of Glory played at the State for one week with the cartoon The Explosive Mr. Magoo. It was succeeded on March 16, 1958 by a double bill of Three Coins in the Fountain (Clifton Webb, Dorothy McGuire, Jean Peters) and Love is a Many-Splendored Thing (William Holden, Jennifer Jones).


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This website is not affiliated with the Detroit Film Theatre, the Michigan Theater, or the Redford Theatre.

Website copyright © 2019 by Robert Hollberg Smith, Jr.

Launched November 25, 2005.

Last updated November 11, 2018.

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