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The Film Programs of the Detroit Film Theatre, Michigan Theater, and Redford Theatre

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November Blog Entries: 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Explore theater history
in the Looking Back feature!

DFT Hosts Dutch and Japanese Films (November 1982)

November Looking Back: 1931 1932 1935 1956 1957 1981 1982

Look What's Coming!

Kick off your Christmas season at the Michigan on November 30 with Home Alone.
Join Bing, Danny, Rosemary, and Vera-Ellen for a White Christmas at the Redford on December 19 and 20.

The DFT presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema on November 28-30 and December 18.

 

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Looking Back

January 1983

Step back in time to see what our area movie theaters were presenting in January 1983. Film titles are linked to the Internet Movie Database.

For more information about these theaters, see Cinema Treasures or Water Winter Wonderland.


Redford Theatre moviegoers celebrated the New Year on January 1 and 2 with A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966), starring Zero Mostel and Phil Silvers. Organist John Lauter provided musical entertainment. On January 14 and 15, organist Don Haller warmed the audience up for the words and music of Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe in the 1967 musical Camelot (Richard Harris, Vanessa Redgrave). On January 28 and 29, James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart starred in the Warner Brothers crime classic Angels with Dirty Faces (1938). At the Barton organ was Newton Bates.

The Detroit Film Theatre began its newest season on January 14-16 with French director Jean-Pierre Melville's thrilling Bob le Flambeur (1956), which returned to the DFT in February 2002. On January 21-23, Fitzcarraldo tried to build an opera house in the middle of a Peruvian jungle in Werner Herzog's tale of ego and obsession. (Fizcarraldo video courtesy of YouTube)

The DFT ended its month with Polish director Jerzy Skolimowski's Moonlighting, "one of the most elegant and convincing—and bitterly funny—movies ever made about the eternal lure of fascism and the universal specter of the bully." (VideoHound's World Cinema, Elliot Wilhelm). The Afternoon Film Theatre continued its tribute to director Tod Browning, with Iron Man (1931), Dracula (1931), Freaks (1932), and Mark of the Vampire (1935).

The Michigan Theatre celebrated its 55th anniversary on January 5 with 50-cent admission for "a rousing theater organ overture" followed by the 1927 Oscar-winning silent film Wings. Audiences enjoyed a double bill of Casablanca (1943) and a movie that it inspired—Woody Allen's comedy Play It Again, Sam (1972).

Other multiple features at the Michigan were French director François Truffaut's Stolen Kisses (1968) and Small Change (1976); and Clint Eastwood in A Fistful of Dollars (1964), For a Few Dollars More (1965), and The Good, Bad, and the Ugly (1966). Live entertainment included the Sixth Ann Arbor Folk Festival and an Up with People benefit concert for the Michigan Theatre. The Michigan Community Theatre Foundation also raised money with a Las Vegas-style Millionaire's Party at the Ann Arbor Inn.


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This web site is not affiliated with the Detroit Film Theatre, the Michigan Theater, or the Redford Theatre.

Web site copyright © 2014 by Robert Hollberg Smith, Jr.

Launched November 25, 2005.

Last updated November 23, 2014.

Graphics courtesy of Christmas Graphics Plus, Free GIFs and Animation, and 123GIFS.

Videos courtesy of YouTube and Turner Classic Movies.