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The Film Programs of the Detroit Film Theatre, Michigan Theater, and Redford Theatre

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Father and Son

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Explore theater history
in the Looking Back feature!

Phantom of the Opera Opens in Detroit (October 1925)

October Looking Back: 1925 1931 1932 1953 1954 1956 1957 1981 1982

Look What's Coming!

The Michigan hosts the Ann Arbor Polish Film Festival on November 7, 8, and 9.
James Stewart and Doris Day star in The Man Who Knew Too Much at the Redford on November 7 and 8.

Pianist David Drazin accompanies Alfred Hitchcock's The Manxman at the DFT on November 1.

 

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Looking Back

November 1981

Step back in time to see what area movie theaters were presenting in November 1981. Film titles are linked to the Internet Movie Database.

For more information about these theaters, see Cinema Treasures or Water Winter Wonderland.


The Detroit Film Theatre's showing of the 1977 Polish political film Man of Marble helped DFT moviegoers better understand the recent rise of the Solidarity labor movement in Poland. A DFT double bill of "Action and Suspense from Down Under" included the Australian films Mad Max (1979, with a young Mel Gibson) and Roadgames (1981). Saturday nights at the DFT included classics from Sweden (Persona, 1966), France (Children of Paradise, 1945) and Russia (October, 1927, with restored footage related to Leon Trotsky).

The DFT's tribute to Alfred Hitchcock continued, with The 39 Steps (1935), Secret Agent (1936), Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937) and The Lady Vanishes (1938). The afternoon film program in the Detroit Institute of Arts paid tribute to French director René Clair, with À Nous la Liberté (1931), Le Million (1931), The Ghost Goes West (1935) and The Flame of New Orleans (1941).

On November 13-15, the Redford added a Sunday afternoon showing of the 1967 musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (with Julie Andrews, Mary Tyler Moore and Carol Channing). The extra day helped business at the Christmas Bazaar of the Motor City Theatre Organ Society, which featured "Dozens of hand-crafted holiday treasures—perfect for the gift-giving season." Two weeks later, on November 27 and 28, Cary Grant livened the Thanksgiving weekend in the 1937 comedy Topper. Organist Danny Holley performed at the Redford on November 7.

Films by Asian Indian director Satyajit Ray appeared at the Michigan. This Classic Film Theatre-sponsored series included Distant Thunder (1973), Pather Panchali (1955), Aparajito (1956) and The World of Apu (1959). CFT double features were devoted to Catherine Deneuve (Mississippi Mermaid (1969) and Belle de Jour (1967)); the Marx Brothers (The Cocoanuts (1929) and Horse Feathers (1932)); and musicals (Swing Time (1936) and The Band Wagon (1953)).

On Friday, November 6, the CFT and the Michigan Community Theatre Foundation presented "Radio City at the Michigan," which included an organ overture, the 1937 movie Topper, and "A Thanksgiving Pageant," described as a "spoof on all Thanksgiving productions". On November 8, organist Don Haller performed at the Michigan in the monthly Second Sunday Organ Concert of the Motor City Theatre Organ Society.

A restored version of the dramatic 1927 French film Napoléon played at Ford Auditorium in Detroit on November 3-8. Described by Detroit Free Press movie writer Jack Mathews as "one of the theatrical experiences of a lifetime," the music for this film was performed live by the Columbus Symphony Orchestra. The conductor and composer of this music was Carmine Coppola, father of film director Francis Ford Coppola.


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This web site is not affiliated with the Detroit Film Theatre, the Michigan Theater, or the Redford Theatre.

Web site copyright © 2014 by Robert Hollberg Smith, Jr.

Launched November 25, 2005.

Last updated October 26, 2014.

Graphics courtesy of Christmas Graphics Plus, Free GIFs and Animation, and 123GIFS.

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